How do you create a communication environment that’s right for you?

I’ve just been trying to organise a night out with a group of friends – can’t be that hard can it? Well, Christmas aside, yes it is. And it’s not because we’re all busy (although we are, of course, isn’t everybody?) but because we’re all on different channels. By which I mean, everyone’s on Whatsapp except one person who can’t get into it because she’s forgotten her password. Not an unsolvable issue, but certainly one that might make you not really want to bother. Everyone’s on Facebook messenger except one person who doesn’t like Facebook. Everyone’s able to text but we can’t do a group text/reply and we all have different phone systems. See where I am going with this?

I do rather love a bit of technology, and I wholeheartedly embrace a whole host of Social Media. I am not one of the naysayers, despite my overwhelming love of face to face communication. But amongst the myriad of different issues the world may have with hi tech communication, it is the number of options available that often leave me frustrated. Too much choice can definitely scupper our chances of doing what many of these things are set up to do  –  allow us to communicate effectively.

When you are in a social group, the stakes are low. Someone may get a bit peeved that they didn’t get an invitation to something, and someone else will probably make sure they get the message a different way. But imagine this in a workplace setting. The stakes are far higher; frustration amongst employees, huge amounts of time wasted chasing things, and worse the haemorrhaging of important information. The possibilities for how to communicate are almost endless; Whatsapp, e-mail, texts, Facebook messenger, Slack, Skype, Snapchat, Yammer, the good old fashioned phone, and a whole lots of other things that I don’t even know about. There is rarely just one system, but there are always a lot of different preferences. We all like different things, and we all like to do things in slightly different ways.

So what’s the answer?

Well, one of the things that can be done in a proactive way, to prevent this discombobulated communication is to have a conversation. Get your employees together and create an opportunity for discussion. Whether this is a meeting, or workshop, or discussion forum, face to face communication is definitely the way forward if you want to alleviate misunderstanding and ambiguity.

  • Ask people what they think works
  • Ask them what they think doesn’t work
  • Tell them what the business needs
  • Find out what they need
  • Look for some common ideas
  • Consider some action steps and agreement use

By getting people to work together, face to face, person to person to share their views you will be providing everyone equal opportunity to get involved. That’s not to say you can’t use technology to hold a workshop or meeting of some kind, and how you do it is important. How you have that discussion matters if you want to get the most out of it. But the getting together of people and engaging staff in this way shows that you care what they think. It demonstrates that you want to find the best way of doing things for everyone. And this matters because they are the ones who will be using it.

The only sure way to make sure that you find out exactly what everyone thinks, is to ask. If you do this right you will have:

  • Had an opportunity to share with everyone the systems that are currently in place
  • Found out which ones are used most and which ones are disregarded
  • Deduced which ones work best and in what situation
  • Given everyone the opportunity to say what they think and to ask questions
  • Involved you staff in creating their own solutions, and to have a say in what happens next. This buy in is probably the most crucial aspect. You need people on board, to use the system in the first place for it to work.

If this type of communication conundrum sounds familiar then why not give me a call. I have been working with Gerald Crittle from GAcceleration, an expert in business communication technology to create some workshop packages. The focus of these workshops is internal communication, and more effective meetings, and both workshops have an employee engagement phase, followed by a technical training. The workshops are carefully designed to make sure everyone that needs to be is involved, engaged and on board so that you can create a communication environment that is right for everyone.

 

Ideation – capturing your ideas the hi-tech no-tech way

Whether you believe you are an “ideas person” or not, everyone has ideas. The trick is effectively capturing them in the first place, so they don’t escape or get lost. Then once they have been captured they need to be cajoled and coaxed, nurtured and guided from that germ of a thought into something that you can actually do something with.

If you have ever tried hard to intentionally come up with an idea, you will know it’s not quite as simple as just having a good think. Even if you are the kind of person that comes up with them readily they don’t always flow productively and have a tendency to go “off piste”. To be truly effective and to harness really useful ideas, you need a good process. And there is nothing like the power of a good group of people to get involved in that process. The collective energy of a lot of people all working at once to come up with some ideas is one of things I love about facilitation.

So, last week with the help of some fabulous participants in the shape of the chicklets on the Bristol Entrepreneurial Spark programme I designed and delivered an ideation workshop. This was for Rosie at Relax Bristol and the aim was to help gather ideas to change her business name. While I created and facilitated the session, this time I had a new tool at my disposal – that of the amazing iDeeter platform accompanied by it’s Director and Co-Founder Niall Jones.

This was a new thing for me – the combination of my more “analogue” approach to workshops – a range of different tools and techniques nicely wrapped up in a whole lot of coloured paper, card, marker pens and assorted lo-tech/ no-tech materials, and iDeeter. iDeeter is a digital platform (a website that you can access on your phone or computer) where you log in and share your ideas with the group of people all working on the same task. It works by asking participants for their ideas which they type them into a smartphone, in response to a specific question. Rather than say their ideas out loud or write them on a piece of paper, or have them scribed on a flipchart they type them into their phones, and then rate them. As you read this, you may get a sense if whether you prefer the digital or analogue approach to all this. The point it, that both are valuable, and the combination means that the session can appeal to all.

It was indeed quite a special session, a melding of different tools that complimented each other brilliantly. The process started with an individual, then paired brainstorm using my lovely Stickywall. This brainstorm was about words, words that were conjured up when people thought about Rosie’s business. Then the participants ranked these ideas using some sticky dots (dot voting).

 

Brainstorming workshop

 

Group participation

Then we started with iDeeter.

The participants we asked to reflect on the ideas that they had just some up with (still posted on the Stickywall) and work again individually, then in pairs to come up with new business names. They then had to use stars or a thumbs up (likes) to rate them. They were able to come up with over 50 ideas and after rating them, a top 4 emerged. We then repeated the process with slogan names.

I can’t reveal the final choices, they are Rosie’s. She is currently digesting and considering those ideas. For her, the next steps are deciding which of the incredible ideas work best for her needs. Or indeed whether none fit just yet, but have perhaps sparked off some further thoughts. But she has some wonderful material to work with. She has a plethora of ideas generated by a whole group of different people, working with both paper based and digital tools to get the best out of their creative minds. A process that, even though I say it myself, was a resounding success.

Ideation session complete.

If you would like to know more about the iDeeter platform then Niall Jones would love to hear from you http://www.ideeter.com/. We hope to be doing some more sessions in the future, so watch this space!

And if you would like to book me for an ideation or brainstorming session, or simply find out more about what I can do, please contact me. Don’t be stuck with no ideas, or perhaps worse – so many that you can’t see where you are going. I can design and deliver a productive workshop that will actually yield some useful ideas – ones that won’t run away or distract you.